Search
Search

EDUCATION

NGO sees dramatic increase in calls to hotline as parents struggle to keep their children in school

NGO sees dramatic increase in calls to hotline as parents struggle to keep their children in school

"Children’s education is taking a hit in favor of other essentials such as food and fuel for heating,” Save the Children writes. (Credit: AFP)

BEIRUT — Calls to international NGO Save the Children's hotline from parents asking for assistance so that their children can attend school rose by 150 percent in November compared to September, a statement published by the organization Monday revealed. According to the organization, this statistic highlights the toll Lebanon’s economic crisis is taking on children’s ability to access education as families make tough choices about how to spend what income they have.

​​Here’s what we know:

    • Lebanon's economic crisis, aggravated by the COVID-19 outbreak, has forced hundreds of families to make tough financial decisions, “and children’s education is taking a hit in favor of other essentials such as food and fuel for heating,” the statement says.

    • According to the statement, the economic crisis has pushed hundreds of families to withdraw their children from private schools and enroll them in public schools, placing further strain on an already overburdened state school system. It goes on to note that many schools lack adequate heating, meaning classroom temperatures can drop below freezing, particularly on campuses located in higher areas. “The helpline has received the highest number of requests for school transportation support this year as winter quickly approaches and many children are walking to school in cold, wet conditions,” Save the Children writes.

    • The statement goes on to point out that refugee children “are often out of school because of extreme poverty, inability to afford transport costs, lack of remedial classes, bullying, and discrimination.”

    • Save the Children cited the example of two sisters identified as Amal and Lena, who are Syrian refugees living in Lebanon and have been out of school for more than two years and whose family is suffering financially as their situation is becoming more difficult with the economic crisis.

    • According to the preliminary findings of the 2021 Vulnerability Assessment of Syrian Refugees in Lebanon, 30 percent of Syrian refugee children have never been to school.

    • “As the pandemic continues to hit families’ finances, many children may never return to school and some families will turn to child marriage and child labor to try to ease their economic difficulties,” Jennifer Moorehead, Save the Children’s country director in Lebanon said.

    • More than 737,000 children are currently out of school in Lebanon, according to the data provided by several organizations including the Education Ministry and the Center for Educational Research and Development. 


BEIRUT — Calls to international NGO Save the Children's hotline from parents asking for assistance so that their children can attend school rose by 150 percent in November compared to September, a statement published by the organization Monday revealed. According to the organization, this statistic highlights the toll Lebanon’s economic crisis is taking on children’s ability to access...